BEACHMERE LAKE – GET IT RIGHT!


Locals are demanding that the Moreton Bay Regional Council “get it right” with regard to the Beachmere Lake and the continuing fish kills in the area.

In 2009, 2010 and again in 2019 thousands of fish have died in the lake due to any number of reasons as provided by Moreton Bay Council.

In 2009 and 2010 reasons for major numbers of fish dying included a blockage in an inlet pipe, construction of a sewerage pumping station and lack of oxygen.

In 2019 a major fish kill, attracting major media attention, was attributed to a blockage in an inlet pipe that caused a loss of tidal flushing to the lake.

Bring on 2020 and yet another fish kill – this time, luckily, on not such a large scale.

The Council advises “the Beachmere Lake is a constructed lake which plays an important role in stormwater and flood mitigation for the Beachmere community” and that it provides “significant visual amenity” to surrounding dwellings.

The Lake is connected to the ocean via a tidal exchange system, which, “assists in maintaining good water quality within an estuarine environment.”

Council says it will be carrying out a number of improvements to Beachmere Lake to improve functionality in June 2020 with an aerator system upgrade “due to the increased maintenance issues and inability to access parts to repair when necessary”. Council staff are currently on site renewing the lake wall – repairs which were delayed from 2019 after the major fish kill at the time.

Water circulation systems have been installed which are to monitor water quality and oxygen levels in the lake.

The latest fish kill, albeit smaller in number but just as devastating for lakeside residents, was purportedly due to a run off of pesticide from the local area. The tidal exchange system was, apparently “working” and water temperature and PH and oxygen levels within an acceptable range.

Although Council representatives and officers advised that samples had been sent off and they were “awaiting test results”, locals are still awaiting confirmation, information and some basic courtesy in replying to requests for information.

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